BSA Royal Star – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Rubric: BSA | 5 Jan 2015 | Comments Off on BSA Royal Star – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
BSA Royal Star – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

BSA Royal Star The BSA Royal Star was a Birmingham Small Arms Company (BSA) motorcycle whose new engine design paved the way for a range of successful unit construction twins. As well as giving a clean look to the engine, with the pushrod passages part of the cylinder block casting, unit construction reduced the number of places oil could leak from. Development [ edit ] The decision by Lucas in the late 1950s to switch production of motorcycle electrical components (from magneto/dynamo systems to alternators/coil systems) forced British motorcycle manufacturers to completely redesign their engines. Triumph and BSA took the opportunity to move from pre-unit and semi-unit construction to ...

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Memorable Motorcycles BSA Gold Star – Motorcycle USA

Rubric: BSA | 4 Jan 2015 | Comments Off on Memorable Motorcycles BSA Gold Star – Motorcycle USA
Memorable Motorcycles BSA Gold Star – Motorcycle USA

Memorable Motorcycles BSA Gold Star In 1938, a new BSA model the M24 Gold Star, was released in commemoration of Wal Handley’s dramatic 100-plus mph lap times at the infamous Brooklands concrete bowl. If there is one classic bike name which still carries immense weight it is the BSA Gold Star. It was the definitive hyper-sports bike of its day – copied to the point of parody by thousands of wannabee Goldie aspirants and revered by riders of every caliber for twenty years. Strangely, for an icon of such legendary proportions, the Goldie was actually as good as its reputation. Even more bizarrely, Goldstars were not only the best production road racer of their era but they were ...

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BSA A7 – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Rubric: BSA | 1 Jan 2015 | Comments Off on BSA A7 – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
BSA A7 – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Engine [ edit ] The 495cc (30.2cuin) twin cylinder engine produced 26bhp (19kW) and was capable of 85mph (137km/h). [ 1 ] A single camshaft behind the cylinders operated the valves via long pushrods passing through a tunnel in the cast iron block. This system needed a considerable number of studs and nuts to fasten down the cylinder head and rockerboxes, many of them deeply recessed and requiring well-made box spanners or the then uncommon sockets. As with other British motorcycles of the period, this kind of set-up regularly led to oil leaks. [ 4 ] Most motorcycles of this period tensioned the primary chain by drawing or rotating the gearbox backwards on a hinge with threaded rods, this ...

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